Archive for the ‘Announcements’ Category

2.1.2 Release Now available

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

pfSense release 2.1.2 follows less than a week after pfSense release 2.1.1.  pfSense 2.1.2 is primarily a security release.

Security Fixes

The Heartbleed OpenSSL bug and another OpenSSL bug which enables a side-channel attack are both covered by the following security announcements:

Packages also have their own independent fixes and need updating. During the firmware update process the packages will be properly reinstalled.   If this fails for any reason, uninstall and then reinstall packages to ensure that the latest version of the binaries is in use.
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pfSense on m3.medium and m3.large Amazon EC2 instances

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

The Netgate pfSense® marketplace AMI can run on the new m3.medium and m3.large instance types with significantly lower AWS usage charges than on the previously available m3.xlarge instance type.

The existing user guide now has a section that mentions “Protecting a private network in VPC”, or you can just read the new section on using VPC with pfSense.

 

Shop at the pfSense store

Monday, December 23rd, 2013

Hide your wallet, the pfSense store is alive. First mentioned in 2008, we’ve finally got it done.

(And you thought 2.1 took a long time.)

Shirts, stickers, pre-loaded USB sticks, and yes, even hardware are now available directly from the same team that brings you pfSense.

Along with pfSense Gold, this is one of the best ways to directly support the project.

To kick things off, we’re running a pre-order sale on shirts. $5.00 off until the end of the year.

(Note that the shipping department will not open until the very beginning of 2014.)

pfSense 2.1 on AWS EC2

Thursday, November 21st, 2013

We now have pfSense 2.1 available on Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2).

Finally.

All instances are currently 64-bit, and thus require HVM.  As such, the EC2 types which are supported are somewhat limited.

Currently there are two versions.   There is a pfSense Certified release available in the AWS Marketplace.  You can find it here: Netgate pfSense Certified Router/Firewall/VPN
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We’re looking for a new support person

Wednesday, November 13th, 2013

First, note the new skin on the blog (and elsewhere around pfsense.org).   Jared has been busy on both the front-end and back-end of the various websites (blog, forum, etc.)  Huge props to him for his efforts.

Second, due to growth in our commercial support, development and rebranding services, we’re in need of a consultant.  Unless you live in Austin, TX, this is a full time (40 hours a week), permanent, work from home position. Exact hours will depend on the chosen candidate’s preference, but need to be mostly sometime between 8 PM and 8 AM US Eastern time to provide coverage for overseas customers.
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… by any other name

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Howdy,

If you’ve downloaded pfSense 2.1, you might have noticed that the footer has changed.  What used to say “BSD Perimeter” now says “ESF”.   In early Spring it became apparent that we should consider a reorganization of the company.  BSD Perimeter is still incorporated in Kentucky, but all of the directors and owners live in Texas.   Re-incorporating gave us chance to clean up a few issues, and to change the name, signaling a break with the past.
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pfSense Gold Subscription Now Available!

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

pfSense Gold is our $99 per year premium membership subscription program, designed to provide special benefits to our members while supporting ongoing development of the Open Source pfSense project.  We hope this dual benefit will make Gold a program worth subscribing to.

Current exclusive benefits for Gold members include:

  • Access to our AutoConfigBackup secure cloud based backup service for up to 10 hosts.**
  • Immediate pre-publication access to the updated pfSense: The Definitive Guide book in PDF, fully updated for the pfSense 2.1 release. This is a significant update to the current book, and currently has approximately 200 additional pages. PDF available for immediate download after purchase!
  • Monthly online MeetUp!  Video conference using Google Hangouts or similar technology, hosted by a rotating selection of core developers with occasional special guests.  We will announce demos / topics in advance and take general questions from the audience.

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7 year anniversary of pfSense

Saturday, November 5th, 2011

7 years ago today, the name pfSense was settled on, and pfsense.org/com/net domains were registered. It’s grown from the volunteer efforts of a handful of people, to one of the most widely used platforms in the world, with a whole team of people making a living working on the project thanks to our support and reseller customers. Thanks to everyone who makes the project possible, and here’s to the next 7 years and beyond!

pfSense exceeds 100,000 known live installs

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

One of the common questions we get is how many installs are out there. While we don’t have any means of definitively knowing, we do have one metric that can be counted. Each month every system updates its IPv4 bogons list once, pulling from one of our servers. By counting the number of unique public IPs using FreeBSD’s fetch to pull that file within one calendar month, we know how many live installs are out there that have Internet connectivity at least.

October 2011 is the first month that number has exceeded 100,000, with a total of 103,137. We’re adding 3000 net new installs on average every month in 2011, with over 4000 additional installs in October.

This under-counts the total for several reasons:

1. Only versions from November 2008 and newer pull this file from our servers, so it does not include older versions. While I expect the vast majority are on newer versions than that, we routinely encounter systems running versions that old and much older.
2. Some systems do not have DNS configured and hence cannot fetch the update.
3. Some systems are on private internal networks that cannot reach the Internet.
4. Some networks have multiple systems that go out from a single public IP, which we only count once.

No telling how many total installs are actually out there, but it’s definitely in excess of 103,000.

Thanks to all our users for helping us reach this significant milestone!

Book foreword / first reviews out

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009

Glad to see two book reviews on Amazon already, both with five stars!

I was thrilled to have the foreword for the book written by one of my favorite authors, Michael W Lucas, the author of Absolute FreeBSD, Absolute OpenBSD, Cisco Routers for the Desperate, PGP & GPG, among other things. Thought I would share it here.

My friends and co-workers know that I build firewalls. At least once a month someone says “My company needs a firewall with X and Y, and the price quotes I’ve gotten are tens of thousands of dollars. Can you help us out?”

Anyone who builds firewalls knows this question could be more realistically phrased as “Could you please come over one evening and slap together some equipment for me, then let me randomly interrupt you for the next three to five years to have you install new features, debug problems, set up features I didn’t know enough to request, attend meetings to resolve problems that can’t possibly be firewall issues but someone thinks might be the firewall, and identify solutions for my innumerable unknown requirements? Oh, and be sure to test every possible use case before deploying anything.”

Refusing these requests makes me seem churlish. Accepting these requests ruins my cheerful demeanor. For a long time, I wouldn’t build firewalls except for my employer. pfSense lets me be a nicer person without having to actually work at it. With pfSense I can deploy a firewall in just a few hours — and most of that is running cables and explaining the difference between “inside” and “outside.” pfSense’s extensive documentation and user community offers me an easy answer to questions — “did you look that up?” If pfSense doesn’t support a feature, chances are I couldn’t support it either. But pfSense supports everything I could ask for, and with a friendly interface to boot. The wide userbase means that features are tested in many different environments and generally “just work,” even when interacting with the CEO’s kids’ Windows ME PC connected to the Internet by Ethernet over ATM over carrier pigeon. Best of all, pfSense is built on much of the same software I’d use myself. I trust the underlying FreeBSD operating system to be secure, stable, and efficient.

Security updates? Just click a button and reboot. You need new features? Just turn them on. pfSense handles clustering, traffic shaping, load balancing, integration with your existing equipment through RADIUS, IPsec, PPTP, monitoring, dynamic DNS, and more. Big-name industry suppliers charge outrageous fees to support what pfSense freely provides. If your employer insists on paying for support contracts, or if you just feel more secure knowing you can pick up the phone and scream for help, you can get pfSense support agreements very reasonably. If you don’t need a support contract, I happen to know that Chris, Jim, or anyone else with a pfSense commit bit will let grateful pfSense users buy them a beer or six.

Personally, I don’t build firewalls from scratch any more. When I need a firewall, I use pfSense.

– Michael W. Lucas